{% layout none %} {% if settings.favicon %} {% endif %} {% include 'social-meta-tags' %} {{ content_for_header }} {% include 'assets' %} Trouts Fly Fishing | Fly Fishing In November {% section 'header' %}
{% section 'announcement' %}
Trouts Journal

Fly Fishing In November

Ivan Orsic / Nov 5, 2014

Welcome to another fantastic month to fly-fish in Colorado. I don’t want to sound too much like the stereotypical fly shop dude/guide where the fishing is always “awesome”…but seriously, we’re looking at another great month to hit the water and enjoy the great outdoors that Colorado has to offer. From a ‘blanket statement’ perspective, many of the same patterns that worked in October will continue to produce in November. Depending on which river you’re fishing, the Brown Trout will still be in some phase of doing their thing, so first and foremost, give them their space if you find them on their redds. I feel a little like a broken record saying this but it’s worth repeating. Also, if you see vacant redds, avoid stepping in them. The biggest Brown Trout of your life may be nothing more than a helpless little egg right now so use caution when wading. Otherwise, if you happen to be on a river where the spawn is tailing out, take advantage of this! Many fish will be on the feed as they a) just used a bunch of energy getting through the spawn and b) pack on the calories for winter. In my opinion, November will the first month where we really start to see the bite change from day to day depending on weather. I just spent 5 of the last 8 days on the water and the 3 “nastiest” days were definitely the most productive. Sometimes I feel the fish need a little extra reminder that winter is coming and they need to get with it. The warm and sunny days just never seem to be as productive for me. Perhaps it’s simply because I’m approaching those days with less confidence due to the conditions, but give me the choice and I’ll take an approaching cold front and a few extra layers of fleece over sunny and 70 every time. With the impending cooler temps, we’ll also start seeing more peak periods of feeding activity throughout the day so stick with it if you happen to be getting less than desirable results on a river you typically do well on. This can be particularly true on freestone rivers which are experiencing greater water temp changes than tailwaters. My guide trip this past Saturday on the Fraser River (a freestone) was a perfect example of this. Once the sun began to set and the temps drop in the late afternoon, the bite slowed significantly. Pay attention to the bug life present and focus on fishing different stages of the hatch- which will most likely be Blue Wing Olives and Midges. Speaking of which, the fish are really keying back into these two food sources in a big way. Additionally, fishing an egg pattern for the next several months will typically always put some fish in the net. San Juan Worms always seem to be a good bet in the state of Colorado, and this will continue to be the case. (The only real consideration with the last two sentences is perhaps the internal self-worth conflict that can come with fishing the spaghetti and meatball rig…..but we won’t dive into this sensitive topic any further) Other than that, we’re still smack dab in the middle of some prime streamer fishing action so keep that in your quiver as you approach the river as well. Many fish will be feeling very aggressive so triggering a big bite with a big fly can be very effective right now. In summary, November should prove to be another very good month to be on the water in Colorado. If you haven’t done so lately, make it a point to get out and enjoy some fall fishing. It won’t be long before the snow starts to fly and many of us refocus our attention towards lift lines instead of fly lines. As always, if you have any questions on fishing during this month, where you should head, or what flies to bring along let us know! We’re here to help in any way possible.

{% section 'social-feed' %} {% section 'footer' %} {% include 'livechat_chat_window' %}