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Trouts Journal

Kick’in it on the Big Horn - a Photo Essay

Ivan Orsic / Apr 12, 2014

Fishing trips are a special thing. The utter simplicity of walking away from your day to day life to focus on nothing more than fooling a fish to eat your fly. A time when the biggest decision you have to make is between 4X and 5X leaders, and what kind of meat you're going to throw on the girll that night. Is it a Makers night, or maybe should we throw ourselves a curve ball and bust out that bottle of Knob Creek? Awe yes, fishing trips are a special thing.

My most recent adventure took me North to Big Sky Country to fish the famed Big Horn River. This river has always been a personal favorite of mine, and for more reasons than the absurd fishing that always seems to come with every visit. This river is a trout factory, and it just so happens to be located in an area void of the conveniences of modern life slowly adopting some modern conveniences (cell phones actually work in Fort Smith now). Eat, Sleep, Fish, Repeat. Yes, a recipe for a World Class Fishing Trip indeed.

The locals made us feel welcome right from the start. This one couldn't say no so the Pink Soft Hackle (hint, these are not available in the local fly shops of Ft. Smith)

The tools of the trade. Sage ONE 590-4 with a Bozeman 325 reel, Sage Method 690-4 with a Hatch Finatic 5+, Scott Radian 905-4 with a Abel Creek III, and a Scott Radian 906-4 with a Bozeman 527.

Midges, check. Worms, scuds and sow bugs, check. 4X leader and tippet, check. Size AB split shot, check. Indicators, check. Keeping it simple, priceless.

We used mostly these...

To catch lots of these.

Big Horn brown trout next to DeYoung brown trout. What can brown do for you?

Evening hydration libations.

Common scenery during our stay.

Netting another Big Horn rainbow. Surprisingly we caught well more browns than bows, so each of these specimens were highly valued.

Most of the trout we caught were eating midges. This guy fell for the good ol' Black Zebra Midge, proving again that simple is often better.

Shop dog extraordinaire Barrett got to make his first trip to the Big Horn.

He had so much fun that by day 4 he was falling asleep on the job.

This was a common site during our week on the Big Horn.

As was this.

And this.

The parting shot.

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