{% layout none %} {% if settings.favicon %} {% endif %} {% include 'social-meta-tags' %} {{ content_for_header }} {% include 'assets' %} {% include 'boost-pfs-style' %} {% include 'sca-quick-view-init' %} Trouts Fly Fishing | UPDATE: CPW has extended and expanded voluntary… {% section 'announcement' %} {% section 'header' %}
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Trouts Journal

UPDATE: Effective September 2nd, Colorado Parks and Wildlife Reduces Voluntary Fishing Closures on the Eagle River

Ivan Orsic / Sep 2, 2022

UPDATE: Effective September 2nd, Colorado Parks and Wildlife has shifted several voluntary fishing closures on the Eagle River.

From Colorado Parks & Wildlife

Grand Junction, Colo. - Recent weather patterns with cooler overnight temperatures and several days of precipitation have led to improved river conditions on the Eagle River prompting Colorado Parks and Wildlife to reduce the extent of voluntary fishing closures.

Effective immediately, the following voluntary fishing closures have been modified:

REMOVED - Afternoon voluntary fishing closure on the Eagle River from Wolcott to Eagle County Fairgrounds.

MODIFIED - From a full-day to an afternoon (noon to midnight) voluntary fishing closure on the Eagle River from the Eagle County Fairgrounds to the Colorado River Confluence.

“I would like to thank anglers for your continued support in conserving this valuable resource,” said Glenwood Springs Aquatic Biologist Kendall Bakich. “The Northwest Region is home to some of Colorado's best-known trout fisheries, including the Eagle River. Closures are a necessary measure to ensure the resiliency of these coldwater fisheries and help conserve these valuable resources for today and future generations.”

Colorado Parks and Wildlife aquatic biologists will continue to monitor river conditions associated with fishing closures on the Yampa and Eagle Rivers. Anglers are encouraged to check current fishing conditions and fishing closure information on the CPW website or by calling the local CPW Office.

While some closures have been lifted, CPW is encouraging anglers to protect these valuable coldwater resources on hot days by keeping the following tips in mind:

Fish early in the morning when water temperatures are cooler.

Bring a thermometer with you to take temperature readings throughout the morning. If temperatures begin to rise it’s time to call it a day.

Take your fishing trip to new heights by fishing in lakes and streams located at higher elevations.

Keep fish submerged when removing the hook, and avoid taking photos to ensure a quick release.
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